Se virksomheder, artikler og job der er relevante for dig:
 

How to write a CV

gem til senere
del
Your CV will likely be the employer’s first impression of you. Here is our guide to help you look your best.

About CV’s

Your CV should summarize your experiences and skills, significantly emphasizing those aspects that relate to the job. It provides a quick overview of who you are and what you have done, indicating for the reader what you could do.

Let everything you write be guided by these questions: what does this say about me and add to my application? Is it what the employer is looking for? Could this be said more persuasively or concisely? Can I evidence what I am writing or quantify my achievement?

Very little time will be devoted by a hiring manager to looking at your CV, probably around 40 seconds. Let that guide what you write and how you organize the information. Avoid using any words on your CV that do not achieve something. You want the reader’s attention to be completely drawn to the good stuff and not overwhelmed with information. A two page CV is perfectly acceptable and what we recommend. Europass style CVs are not welcomed by employers in Denmark. 

Today’s CV extends well beyond what you send to the employers, to not just your LinkedIn profile but anything that can be found through a search engine. Assume that an employer will research you online. A good CV will direct their attention to what you want them to see: LinkedIn, a portfolio, blog, example work etc. Consider posting a few things prior to the interview on your social media that indicates your interest in the relevant industry or company values.

Producing a good CV is as much about doing things that are relevant to your career aspirations as it is about what you write. The more you can show that your experience is relevant to the role you are applying to the better. Although preferable, you don’t have to have worked in the same industry to which you are applying. What skills and knowledge do you have that is relevant or interesting for the employer?

Customize every time!

Aim to create a common thread throughout your CV that fits with the requirements of the job to which you are applying, emphasizing features of your experience that match the position requirements. Try to keep a regularly updated record of all your experiences.

The right structure for your CV?

The structure of your CV is less important than whether it is clear and concise. When written well a CV that is organized around your skills can be very effective. However, this can be difficult to achieve without unnecessary duplication of information and may leave the reader unclear about the journey you have. For students and young graduates we recommend the chronological style of CV. All CVs should give more information about your most recent experiences.

Focus on positive results

Your CV should explain the outcomes of your different responsibilities so the employer knows what you have achieved. The more specific and more quantitative the results you give the better. You can also provide links to examples of your work and recommendations from colleagues. 

Add breadth to your CV with additional skills 

It is worthwhile including additional ‘hard’ skills you have developed if they are not explained in your responsibilities. You will likely have done something interesting outside of studying that will have developed you as a person. Include these things that suggest a positive personal attribute, skills and accomplishment. You may well find that these are topics of conversation in the interview and help you build rapport. Avoid simply listing your interests (ie ‘reading, chess, baking….’), which adds little and might appear unprofessional. 

Be honest

Never lie but do be persuasive, positive and confident. There shouldn’t be any gaps that might leave the reader with questions.

Ready to make a CV?

Great - you can find a CV-example here to get you started. Good luck!

 


Relaterede artikler
Illustration
Graduate success
How do you make your work interesting and speed up your progression towards the bigger projects and the freedom to pursue your own business ideas?
07.05.2024
Af: Daniel Bird (edited 2024)
Illustration
Walk like a Dane, talk like a Dane
Entering a new workplace for the first time can be a daunting prospect anywhere but it is likely to be even more so as an international in Denmark.
08.05.2024
Af: Daniel Bird (edited 2024)
Illustration
From student to graduate employee
Chiara Surico, Capability Building Manager for A.P. Moller Maersk, talks to us about how to make the transition from international student in Denmark to graduate employee.
21.04.2023
Af: Daniel Bird
Illustration
Narrowing in on your career target
Simon Heisterkamp shares what he has learnt on his journey to working for Terma as a Systems Engineer in Defence & Security.
10.06.2024
Af: Daniel Bird (edited 2024)
Illustration
A Guide For The Storm
We’ve spoken to the people in the know about the crucial things to be aware of as an international student, job hunting in Denmark. Here is their key advice to all your questions.
07.05.2024
Af: Daniel Bird (edited 2024)
Illustration
90 Interview Questions
What could you get asked at a graduate job interview? We've asked interviewers in large and small companies, the private and public sector to tell us.
07.05.2024
Af: Daniel Bird
Illustration
12 negotiation tips
Be sure to start off on the right foot, when you and a prospective employer are sitting at the negotiating table. Here is our guide on how to do it.
07.05.2024
Af: Daniel Bird (edited 2024)
Illustration
Trade brain power for DKK
This is a quick but comprehensive information source and guide to student finances to set you on the path that leads away from student poverty in Denmark or abroad.
03.02.2023
Af: Daniel Bird
Illustration
Writing applications
Here are some quick tips to try and ensure your application is at the top of the pile. The advice here will very likely apply to all applications for a job you’ll ever make whether it is a solicited or invited application, for a student or graduate position and in Denmark or elsewhere.
07.05.2024
Af: Daniel Bird (edited 2024)
Illustration
5 common mistakes in job searching in Denmark
Being an international is tough, especially in Denmark. We have to learn not only the culture and language but how to go about job searching in Denmark. I understand this feeling being an American and living in Denmark. It has had its challenges, especially in finding your dream job while living in a foreign country.
07.05.2024
Af: Kate Dahl - Job Consultant for Internationals in Denmark, CareerDenmark.dk
Illustration
Salary negotiations and more
When you and a prospective employer engage in contract negotiations, it is not only your salary that's on the line. Pension, working hours and more can also be brought to the bargaining table. Here is our guide on what to negotiate with your workplace.
07.05.2024
Af: Daniel Bird, edited 2024
Illustration
Managing your interview nerves
For some, being nervousness can be so strong at interview that it can seriously impair their performance. This need not be the case. Lykke Pedersen, MSc., gives advice on how to get your nervousness to work for you.
10.05.2021
Af: Lykke Pedersen, MSc (interview)
Illustration
When is the right time to study an MBA?
The MBA is a big commitment and, right now, it can feel like an even bigger decision. While there’s technically no right or wrong time to do an MBA, there are some considerations to keep in mind.
07.05.2024
Af: QS (sponsored article)
HPT