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Getting work in Denmark

 
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Often associated with H.C. Andersen and his 'Little Mermaid', Denmark is often portrayed as a fairy tale kind of place. Denmark is first and foremost a socially balanced and progressive society - and a great place to start your career.

Entering the Danish labour market
Nordic citizens of Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden are free to enter, reside, study and work in Denmark. If you want to stay in Denmark for more than six months, you have to apply for a civil registration number (’CPR number’) at the Citizen Service in your municipality. Further information can be found at newtodenmark.dk and workindenmark.dk

EU/EEA-citizens and nationals of Switzerland - are also free to enter, reside, study and work here. However, if you want to stay in Denmark for more than three months, you will have to apply for a registration certificate at your Regional State Administration (’Statsforvaltning’). Subsequently, you must apply for a civil registration number (’CPR number’) at the Citizen Service in your municipality, if you plan on staying for more than six months. After graduation you may stay in Denmark for up to six months to look for a job. Further information can be found at statsforvaltning.dk and workindenmark.dk

Citizens from the rest of the world are generally not allowed to enter, reside, study and work in Denmark without a visa, residence or work permit. When you graduate from an institution of higher education in Denmark, you may stay here for up to six months to look for a job. Your residence permit must be valid for an additional six months after you graduate. If you have not previously been granted an extension to your permit, you can apply for it at The Danish Immigration Service.
When you find a job in Denmark, your employer must apply for a work permit at The Danish Immigration Service on your behalf.

Work while studying
As a Nordic, EU/EEA or Swiss citizen, you do not need a work permit and there are no restrictions to the number of hours you can work in Denmark while you study. Students from the rest of the world may work in Denmark for up to 15 hours per week, and full-time during the months of June, July and August. The only requirements is a work permit sticker in your passport. If you were not granted a work permit when you received your permission to study in Denmark, you can apply for it at The Danish Immigration Service.

Getting your international diploma assessed
In order to work in certain professions in Denmark – so-called ’regulated professions’
– you must meet certain requirements regarding your professional qualifications. Certain authorities will assess your qualifications in your professional field, subsequently granting or denying you permission to pursue your profession in Denmark. This permit is usually called an authorisation.

Learn Danish
Even though nearly everyone in Denmark speaks English, some Danish will benefit you and increase your chances of finding employment in Denmark. As an employee or student in Denmark, you have the opportunity to take Danish language lessons for free. To find out about courses in your area, please contact the Citizen Service or the job centre in your municipality. Further information can be found at laerdansk.dk/en

Online Danish courses are also available. These web-based courses are targeted at both beginners and those who already have some knowledge of the language. Students and graduates can use them to reach a good level of linguistic proficiency.
Further information can be found at laerdansk.dk/en

Danish courses:


Unemployment insurance
Unemployment insurance in Denmark is optional. You can become a member of an unemployment insurance fund if you are between 18-63 years of age and work and reside in Denmark or another EU/EEA country. Further information can be found at workindenmark.dk


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